Landmark resolution honors Bishop Senyonjo, works around anti-gay Provinces

Update: The part of the resolution honoring Bishop Christopher passed, the other section did not - a good step forward. 

Testimony on a landmark resolution that both honors Bishop Christopher Senyonjo (shown at left preaching at the 2012  Pride Eucahrist on the street in downtown San Francisco), retired Bishop of West Uganda, and opens the door to work with Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in areas like Uganda “where the policies and programs of a Province may be in opposition to the inclusive values of The Episcopal Church and current American foreign policy towards LGBT people.”

If approved by the General Convention, the resolution would allow the Episcopal Church to give financial support directly to NGOs in areas where our money could support anti=-gay [policies or employees.

The measure could also allow the national church to work around provinces that do not have a strong track record in using our funds as planned.  Oasis California will testify in support of Resolution D017 at 7:30 a.m. Monday in Room 6 of the Downtown Marriott. The text of this proposal as introduced by The Rev. Vanessa Glass follows:

 

RESOLUTION TEXT

Resolved, the House of _______ concurring, That the 77th General Convention

recognize the courageous witness of Bishop Christopher Senyonjo, retired Bishop

of West Uganda, particularly with LGBT people in Uganda and in 76 countries

where they are criminalized; and be it further

Resolved, That this General Convention support Anglican and other ministries

engaged in the intersection of rights, development and justice consistent with our

mission priorities and Millennium Development Goals; and be it further

Resolved, That the World Mission Committee urges funding organizations of The

Episcopal Church to expand partner relationships with other Non-Governmental

Organizations whose missions are consistent with the mission goals of The

Episcopal Church. These new partnerships can augment our mission

commitment in areas where there may be no significant Anglican presence or

where the policies and programs of a Province may be in opposition to the

inclusive values of The Episcopal Church and current American foreign policy

towards LGBT people.